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Vitamins and Minerals to stimulate pigmentation in vitiligo

vitiligo,nathalie pelletier,melaninVitamins and minerals are crucial to healthy skin and for the production of melanin (skin pigment). We can get these necessary building blocks from the foods we eat, the sun, and by taking supplemental vitamins. For those of us with vitiligo, it is important for us to focus on maintaining our healthy pigmented skin cells and attempt to rebuild or stimulate new pigment in the white patched areas of vitiligo.

I’ve compiled a list of the vitamins and minerals that we need to help our vitiligo; they are: B5 pantothenic acid, B9 folic acid, B12, Vitamin C, Copper, Vitamin D, and Zinc.

Top 10 Foods Highest in Vitamin B5 (Pantothenic Acid)

Vitamin B5, or Pantothenic Acid, is an essential vitamin required by the body for cellular processes and optimal maintenance of fat. A deficiency of vitamin B5 is rare, however, when it does occur is usually seen in the form of irritability, fatigue, apathy, numbness, paresthesia, and muscle cramps. It can also lead to increased sensitivity to insulin, or hypoglycemia. Pantothenic Acid, Vitamin B5, is a water soluble vitamin that is well regulated by the body, thus overdose is rare, and may only be noticed in the form of slight digestive complaints or diarrhea. The current RDA for Pantothenic Acid (Vitamin B5) is 10mg, below is a list of vitamin B5 rich foods.

#1: Liver

The liver of most any animal is packed with pantothenic acid (vitamin B5). Often appearing on the culinary scene as pâté, liver can also be eaten in sausage (liverwurst), and prepared steamed or fried with onions and herbs. Chicken liver provides the most vitamin B5 with 8.3mg per 100g serving or 83% of the RDA. That is 7mg (71% RDA) per 3oz serving, 2.3mg (23% RDA) per ounce.

#2: Bran (Rice and Wheat)

Crude rice and wheat bran are rich in vitamin B6 as well as vitamin B3 (niacin). Eat whole foods like brown rice, and whole wheat bread, which still contain the bran that has been taken out of refined foods. Rice bran contains the most pantothenic acid with 7.4mg (74% RDA) per 100g serving, or 8.7mg (87% RDA) per cup, 0.6mg (5% RDA) per tablespoon. Wheat bran contains 2.2mg (22% RDA) per 100 gram serving, or 1.3mg (13% RDA) per cup, 0.08mg (1% RDA) per tablespoon.

#3: Sunflower Seeds

Sunflower seeds are great as a snack or as an addition to salads, they are also a great source of vitamin E, iron, vitamin B1 (thiamin), vitamin B6, vitamin B9 (Folate), protein, magnesium, potassium, and copper. Sunflower seeds provide 7.1mg (71% RDA) of pantothenic acid per 100 gram serving, that is 9.5g (95% RDA) of vitamin B5 per cup, and 1.98mg (20% RDA) per ounce.

#4: Whey Powder

Once thought the sole domain of body builders, whey powder is now entering the main stream as more people are going vegetarian. Whey powder is a common addition to breads and smoothies, 100 grams (about 2 cups) of whey powder will provide 5.6mg (56% RDA) of vitamin B5, that is 8.15mg (81% RDA) per cup, and 0.45mg (5% RDA) per tablespoon.

#5: Mushrooms

Mushrooms are a low calorie food that are also a great source of vitamin B5. Cooked Shiitake mushrooms provide the most pantothenic acid with 3.6mg (36% RDA) per 100 gram serving, 5.2mg (52% RDA) in one cup chopped, and 2.6mg (26% RDA) in 4 mushrooms.

#6: Caviar

Caviar is not as expensive as people think and is a great source of iron, protein, and vitamin B12. 100 grams of caviar will provide 3.5mg (35% RDA) of pantothenic acid, or 1mg (10% RDA) per ounce, 0.56mg (6% RDA) per tablespoon.

#7: Cheese

Despite being a high cholesterol food, cheese is a good source of calcium, protein, Riboflavin (Vitamin B2), and Cobalamin (Vitamin B12). The amount of vitamin B5 in cheese depends on type and variety, Gjetost provides the most vitamin B5 with 3.5mg (34% RDA) per 100g serving, 7.6mg (76% RDA) per 8oz package, and 0.94mg (9% RDA) per ounce.

#8: Sun-dried Tomatoes

Sun-dried tomatoes are a high iron and potassium food. They are great in sauce, on pizza, and even in salads. 100 grams of sun-dried tomatoes provides 2.1mg (21% RDA) of vitamin B5, or 1.1mg (11% RDA) per cup, and 0.04mg (0% RDA) per piece.

#9: Fish

Fish is a heart healthy food, a good source of protein, and rich in vitamins B1, B2, B3, B6, and B12. Wild Atlantic salmon provides the most vitamin B5 with 1.9mg (19% RDA) per 100 gram serving, 3mg (30% RDA) in half a fillet, and 1.63mg (16% RDA) per 3 ounce serving.

#10: Avocados

Avocados are a heart healthy fruit, and a great source of vitamin B5. Avocados will provide 1.5mg (15% RDA) of pantothenic acid per 100 gram serving, or 2mg (20% RDA) per fruit, 3.4mg (34% RDA) per cup pureed.

Top 10 Foods Highest in Vitamin B9 (Folic Acid)

Vitamin B9 (aka: folate, folic acid, folicin) is a water-soluble B vitamin with many rich natural sources. Vitamin B9 (folate) is required for numerous body functions including DNA synthesis and repair, cell division, and cell growth. A deficiency of folate can lead to anemia in adults, and slower development in children. For pregnant women, folate is especially important for proper fetal development. Folate, Vitamin B9, is a water soluble vitamin that is well regulated by the body, thus overdose is rare in natural food sources, and can only occur from supplements. The current RDA for Folate (Vitamin B9) is 400?g, below is a list of the top ten foods highest in (folate) vitamin B9.

#1: Yeast Extract Spread (Marmite)

Yeast extract spread is common in British cultures and is a high protein food, a rich vitamin B1 (thiamine) food, a rich vitamin B2 (riboflavin) food, and a good vegan source of vitamin B12. In addition the spread is a good source of folate (vitamin b9) providing 1010?g (253% RDA) per 100 gram serving, or 60.6?g (15% RDA) per teaspoon.

#2: Liver

The liver of most any animal is packed with vitamin B9. Often appearing on the culinary scene as pâté, liver can also be eaten in sausage (liverwurst), and prepared steamed or fried with onions and herbs. Turkey liver provides the most folate (B9) with 691?g per 100g serving or 173% of the RDA. That is 573.53?g (143% RDA) of vitamin B9 in a whole turkey liver (about 3 ounces).

#3: Dried Herbs

Dried herbs are packed with the vitamins and minerals you need like iron, calcium, potassium, vitamin A, vitamin K, and magnesium. Start making it a habbit to add more dry herbs to all the dishes you eat. Dried spearmint provides the most folate with 530?g (133% RDA) per 100 gram serving, or 10.6?g (3% RDA) per tablespoon. Dried rosemary provides 307?g (77% RDA) of vitamin b9 per 100 gram serving, or 9.21?g (2% RDA) per tablespoon. After rosemary follows dried basil, chervil, coriander, marjoram, thyme, bay leaf and finally dried parsley which provides 180?g (45% RDA) of vitamin b9 per 100 gram serving, or 3.6?g (1% RDA) per tablespoon.

#4: Sunflower Seeds

Sunflower seeds are great as a snack or as an addition to salads, they are also a great source of vitamin E, iron, vitamin B1 (thiamin), B6, protein, magnesium, potassium, and copper. Sunflower seeds provide 238?g (60% RDA) of folate per 100 gram serving, that is 319?g (80% RDA) of vitamin b9 per cup, and 66.6?g (17% RDA) per ounce.

#5: Dry Roasted Soybeans (Edamame)

Also a good source of riboflavin (b2) dry roasted soybeans are a great snack. Be sure to look for low sodium varieties to keep your blood pressure low. Dry roasted soybeans, or edamame, provide 205?g (51% RDA) of folate per 100 gram serving, or 353?g (88% RDA) of vitamin b9 per cup.

#6: Dark Leafy Greens (Spinach, Turnip Greens, Collards)

High in vitamin K and calcium, as well as folate, dark leafy greens are superfoods. Raw spinach and raw turnip greens provide the most folate with 194?g (49% RDA) per 100 gram serving, 58.2?g (15% RDA) per cup, and 106.7?g (27% RDA) per cup chopped. Raw collard greens provide 166?g (42% RDA) of folate per 100 gram serving, and 59.8?g (15%) RDA per cup chopped.

#7: Bean Sprouts (Soybean and Pea)

Fresh bean sprouts can be found in the vegetable/salad section of most stores and makes a great addition to a salad or stir fry. Fresh soybean sprouts provide the most vitamin B9 with 172?g (43% RDA) per 100 gram serving, 120.4?g (30% RDA) per cup, or about 17.2?g (4% RDA) of folate in 10 sprouts. Pea sprouts provide 144?g (36% RDA) of folate per 100 gram serving, 173?g (43% RDA) per cup.

#8: Beans (Pinto, Garbanzo, Mung)

Pinto and Garbanzo beans (Chickpeas) provide 172?g (43% RDA) of folate per 100 gram serving, ~29?g (20% RDA) per cup. Mung beans provide 159?g (40% RDA) of folate per 100 grams, 321 (80% RDA) per cup. Mung beans are followed by lima beans, black beans, yard long beans, and finally navy beans which provide 140?g (35% RDA) per 100 gram serving, 254.8?g (64% RDA) per cup

#9: Asparagus

Asparagus is an excellent vegetable and a vitamin K rich food. Asparagus provides 149?g (37% RDA) of folate per 100 gram serving, 268?g (68% RDA) per cup, and 89.4?g (22% RDA) in about 4 spears.

#10: Peanuts

In addition to folate, peanuts are a great source of zinc, protein, vitamin E, magnesium, and copper. Peanuts are great as a snack, added to cereals, or crushed into butter. Peanuts provide 145?g (36% RDA) of folate in a 100 gram serving, that is 211.7?g (53% RDA) per cup, and 1.45?g of vitamin b9 per peanut.

Top 10 Foods Highest in Vitamin B12

Vitamin B-12, or Cobalamin, is the largest and most complex vitamin currently known to man. A slight deficiency of vitamin B-12 can lead to anemia, fatigue, mania, and depression, while a long term deficiency can potentially cause permanent damage to the brain and central nervous system. Vitamin B-12 can only be manufactured by bacteria and can only be found naturally in animal products, however, synthetic forms are widely available and added to many foods like cereals. Vitamin B-12 can be consumed in large doses because excess is excreted by the body or stored in the liver for use when supplies are scarce. Stores of B-12 can last for up to a year. Below is a list of the top ten vitamin b12 rich foods. Click here for other foods high in vitamin b.

#1: Clams, Oysters, and Mussels

Shellfish are a great source of vitamin B12 and can be eaten raw, baked, steamed, fried, or made into chowder. In addition to vitamin B12 shellfish are a good source of zinc, copper, and iron. Clams provide the most vitamin B-12 with 98.9?g per 100g serving, accounting for 1648% of the RDA. That is 84?g (1401% RDA) per 3 ounce serving, and 187.9?g (3132% RDA) in 20 small clams, or 9.4?g (156.6 %RDA) in one small clam. Mussels and oysters are also good sources of B12 providing 600% RDA and 400% RDA per 100 gram serving.

#2: Liver

Often appearing on the culinary scene as pâté, liver can also be prepared steamed or fried with onions and herbs. The liver of most any animal is packed with vitamin B-12, the highest on the list are: Lamb, beef, veal, moose, turkey, duck, and goose respectively. Lamb liver provides 85.7?g (1428% RDA) of vitamin B12 per 100g serving, or 72.85?g (230% RDA) in a 3 ounce serving.

#3: Caviar (Fish Eggs)

Caviar and fish eggs are most often eaten as a garnish or spread. The eggs of whitefish contain the most vitamin B-12 with 56.4?g (940% RDA) per 100g serving. Caviar contains a third of that with 20?g (333% RDA) of vitamin B12 per 100g serving, 5.6?g (93% RDA) per ounce, and 3.2?g (53% RDA) per tablespoon. Chicken eggs, by comparison, only offer 1.29?g (22% RDA) of vitamin B-12 per 100g serving, or 0.65?g (11% RDA) per egg.

#4: Octopus

Popular in Mediterranean, Japanese, and Hawaiian cuisine, octopus is a vitamin b12 rich food. Cooked octopus provides 36?g of vitamin B-12 per 100 gram serving accounting for 600% of the RDA. That is 30.6?g (510% RDA) per 3 ounce serving, or 10.2?g (170% RDA) per ounce. Raw octopus provides about half as much vitamin b12 with 20?g (333% RDA) per 100 gram serving, 17?g (283% RDA) in a 3 ounce serving, and 5.67?g (94.33% RDA) per ounce.

#5: Fish

Known for their omega 3 fats and for being a high protein food, fish are also a good source of vitamin B12. Mackerel provides the most vitamin B-12 with 19?g per 100g serving (317% RDA), followed by Herring (312% RDA), Salmon (302%), Tuna (181%), Cod (167%), Sardines (149%), Trout (130%), and Bluefish (104%).

#6: Crab and Lobster

Crab and lobster are most commonly served baked, steamed, or in bisque. A 100g serving of crab contains 11.5?g of vitamin B12 (192% of the RDA), that is 15.4?g (257%RDA) per leg (134g). Lobster will provide 4.04?g(67% RDA) per 100g serving, or 6.59?g (110% RDA) in an average whole lobster (163g).

#7: Beef

In addition to being a vitamin B12 rich food, beef is also a good source of protein, zinc, and heme-iron. The amount of vitamin B-12 in beef depends on the cut, lean fat-trimmed chuck contains the most vitamin B12 with 6.18?g (103% RDA) per 100g serving, 11.49?g (103% RDA) in a chuck steak, and 5.25?g (88% RDA) in a 3 ounce serving. Chuck is followed by sirloin (62% RDA), rib-eye (60% RDA), and ribs (58% RDA).

#8: Lamb (Mutton)

Lamb is a common meat in the Middle East, Mediterranean, East Asia, Australia, New Zealand, and most of Europe. Lamb is a high cholesterol food so be sure to look for lean cuts which are higher in B12 anyway. Lamb also provides high amounts of protein, and zinc. The shoulder is the cut of lamb with the most vitamin B-12 providing 3.71?g (62% RDA) per 100g serving, 5.82?g (97% RDA) per pound, and 3.15?g (53% RDA) in a 3 ounce serving. The shoulder is followed by the foreshank and leg which provides 53% of the RDA per 100g serving, and lamb chops which provide 51% of the RDA for vitmain B12 per 100 gram serving.

#9: Cheese

Despite being a high cholesterol food, cheese is a good source of calcium, protein, and Riboflavin (Vitamin B2). The amount of vitamin B12 in cheese depends on type and variety, Swiss cheese provides the most with 3.34?g (56% RDA) per 100g serving, followed by Gjetost (40% RDA), Mozzarella(39% RDA), Parmesan (38% RDA), Tilsit (35% RDA), and Feta (28% RDA).

#10: Eggs

When it comes to chicken eggs the raw yellow has most of the vitamin B-12 with 1.95?g per 100g serving (33%), however, this equates to 0.33?g per yolk or just 6% of the RDA. The eggs of other animals are higher with a goose egg providing 7.34?g (122% RDA) of vitamin B-12 per 100g serving, and a duck egg providing 3.78?g (63% RDA).

Top 10 Foods Highest in Vitamin C

Vitamin C is an essential nutrient required by the body for the development and maintenance of scar tissue, blood vessels, and cartilage. Vitamin C is also necessary for creating ATP, dopamine, peptide hormones, and tyrosine. As a powerful antioxidant, vitamin C helps lessen oxidative stress to the body and is thought to lower cancer risk. The current RDA for vitamin C is 60mg, below is a list of foods high in vitamin C. For those looking to consume extremely high levels of vitamin C supplements are also available.

#1: Red and Green Hot Chili Peppers

An excellent way to spice up soups, curries, and sauces, green chilies provide the most vitamin C than any other food with 242.5mg (404% RDA) per 100 gram serving, 181.88mg (303% RDA) in a half cup chopped, and 109.13mg (182% RDA) in a single green chili pepper. Red chilies provide 144mg (240% RDA) of vitamin C per 100g serving, 108mg (180% RDA) per half cup chopped, and 65mg (108% RDA) per pepper.

#2: Guavas

Depending on variety, guavas can provide as much as 228mg (381% RDA) of vitamin C per 100g serving, 377mg (628% RDA) per cup, and 126mg (209% RDA) per fruit.

#3: Bell Peppers

A staple of pasta sauce and pizza the sweet bell pepper packs a high vitamin C punch. The amount of vitamin C depends on color. Yellow peppers provide the most vitamin C with 184mg (206% RDA) per 100 gram serving, 341mg (569% RDA) per pepper, and 95mg (159% RDA) in 10 sliced strips. Green peppers provide the least vitamin C with 132mg (220% RDA) per pepper.

#4: Fresh Herbs (Thyme and Parsley)

Fresh and dried herbs are packed with vitamins and health benefits, they can be used in almost any soup, stew, or as the main ingredient to a salad like tabouleh. Thyme provides the most vitamin C of any herb with 160mg (267% RDA) per 100 gram serving, 1.6mg (3% RDA) in a single teaspoon. Parsley provides 133mg (222% RDA) per 100 gram serving, 79mg (133% RDA) per cup, 5mg (9% RDA) per tablespoon, 13.3mg (22% RDA) in 10 sprigs.

#5: Dark Leafy Greens (Kale, Mustard Greens, Garden Cress)

Dark leafy greens are more than just a source of calcium, and are packed with other vitamins including vitamin C. Raw kale provides the most vitamin C with 120mg (200% RDA) per 100 gram serving, 80mg (134% RDA) per cup chopped. It is followed by mustard greens which provide 70mg (117% RDA) per 100 gram serving, and 29mg (65% RDA) per cup chopped. Garden cress provides 69mg (115% RDA) per 100 gram serving, or 35mg (58% RDA) per cup.

#6: Broccoli, Cauliflower, Brussels Sprouts

Broccoli provides 89mg (149% RDA) of vitamin C in a 100g serving, 81mg (135% RDA) per cup chopped, 28mg (46% RDA) per piece. Raw cauliflower provides much less with 46mg (77% RDA) per cup, raw brussles sprouts provide 75mg (125% RDA) per cup, 16mg (27% RDA) per sprout.

#7: Kiwi Fruits (Chinese Gooseberries)

Kiwi fruits are tart as well as decorative, they make a great addition to any fruit salad or dessert. A 100g serving will provide 93mg (155% RDA) of vitamin C, that is 164 mg (273% RDA) per cup, 84mg (141% RDA) per fruit.

#8: Papayas (aka: Lechoza, Mamão, Pawpaw)

In addition to vitamin C, papaya is also a great source of vitamin A and folate (vitamin B9). Papaya provides 62mg (103% RDA) per 100 gram serving, that is 87mg (144% RDA) per cup cubed, and 188mg (313% RDA) in a medium sized papaya.

#9: Oranges and Clementines (Tangerines)

Oranges, citrus fruits, and their zest (the shavings of their peel) are all high in vitamin C. Oranges provide 59mg (99% RDA) per 100 gram serving, 98mg (163% RDA) per cup, and 83mg (138% RDA) per orange. Clementines, or tangerines, provide 49mg (81% RDA) per 100 gram serving, or 36mg (60% RDA) per fruit.

#10: Strawberries

Strawberries are delicious and make a great addition to desserts or drinks. Strawberries provide 59mg (98% RDA) per 100 gram serving, 98mg (163 % RDA) per cup slices, and 11mg (18% RDA) in a single large strawberry.

Top 10 Foods Highest in Copper

Copper is an essential mineral required by the body for bone & connective tissue production, and for coding specific enzymes that range in function from eliminating free radicals to producing melanin. A deficiency in copper can lead to osteoporosis, joint pain, lowered immunity, and since copper is essential for the absorption of iron, anemia. Conversely, over-consumption of copper will lead to cramps, diarrhea, and vomiting in the short term, and can lead to depression, schizophrenia, hypertension, senility, and insomnia in the long term. The stomach needs to be acidic in order to absorb copper and thus antacids interfere with the absorption of copper, as do milk and egg proteins. The current RDA for copper is 2mg. Below is a list of high copper foods.

#1: Liver (Pâté)

The liver of any animal is packed with vitamins and minerals, and is best prepared steamed or fried with onions and herbs. Veal liver provides the most copper with 15mg per 100g serving or 81% of the RDA. A typical 67 gram portion will provide 504% of the RDA for copper. A single tablespoon of pâté will provide 0.5mg of copper or 3% of the RDA.

#2: Oysters

Depending on type and variety oysters provide 1-8mg of copper per 100g serving, accounting for 37%-500% of the RDA. The oyster highest in copper is the steamed wild eastern oyster which provides 0.5mg(27% RDA) per oyster. In general, wild caught oysters provide more copper than farm raised.

#3: Sesame Seeds and Tahini(Sesame Butter)

Dried sesame seeds make a great topping and contain 7.75mg of copper per 100 gram serving or 204% of the RDA, that is 0.4mg (18%RDA) per table spoon. Tahini is commonly found in hummus, a ground chickpea spread and dip of the Middle East, it will provide 0.24mg (12% RDA) of copper per tablespoon.

#4: Cocoa Powder and Chocolate

Unsweetened cocoa powder is a versatile ingredient that can be used in hot chocolate or chocolate banana pudding. 100 grams will provide 3.8mg of copper or 189% RDA. That is 3.3mg (163% RDA) of copper per cup, and 0.18mg (9% RDA) per tablespoon. A square of baking chocolate will provide 0.9mg of copper (47% RDA).

#5: Nuts

Nuts make a great snack, and are also a good source of copper. Cashew nuts provide the most copper with 2.2mg (111% RDA) per 100 gram serving, that is 3mg (152% RDA) per cup, and 0.2mg (10% RDA) per tablespoon. Other nuts high in copper include Hazelnuts (88% RDA), Brazil nuts (87% RDA), Walnuts (79% RDA), Pistachios (66% RDA), Pine Nuts (66% RDA), Peanuts (65% RDA), Pecans (60% RDA), and Almonds (59% RDA). Most mixed nuts combos contain 83% RDA per 100 gram serving (3/4 cup).

#6: Calamari and Lobster

Calamari (or squid) and lobster are both high in copper. 100 grams of calamari will provide 2.1mg of copper for 106% of the RDA. 100 grams of lobster will provide 1.9mg of copper or 97% RDA. That is about 2.8mg (140% RDA) per cup of lobster meat.

#7: Sunflower Seeds

A great snack on the go, or a great garnish on salads and soups, sunflower seeds provide 1.8mg (92% RDA) of copper per 100 gram serving. That is 2.5mg (123% RDA) per cup and 0.5mg (26% RDA) per ounce.

#8: Sun Dried Tomatoes

Sun Dried Tomatoes are delicious in a sandwich or as an ingredient in pasta sauce. 100 grams (about 2 cups) will provide 1.4mg of copper or 71% of the RDA. That is 0.8mg (38% RDA) per cup, and 0.03mg(1% RDA) per piece.

#9:Roasted Pumpkin and Squash Seeds

A popular food in the Middle East and East Asia pumpkin and squash seeds contain about 1.4mg of copper per 100g serving (70% RDA). That is 1.9mg (96% RDA) per cup, and 0.4mg (19% RDA) per tablespoon. If you can’t find these in your local supermarket you will surely find them in Middle Eastern or East Asian specialty stores. Alternatively, you can also save any pumpkin and squash seeds you have and roast them in your oven. The seeds are typically consumed by cracking the outer shell and eating the seed inside.

#10: Dried Herbs

Long used for medicinal purposes, herbs are packed with nutrients and copper is no exception. Dried Basil provides the most copper with 1.4mg per 100 gram serving, or 68% of the RDA. That is 0.03mg (1% RDA) per tablespoon. Other herbs high in copper include Marjoram (57% RDA), Oregano (47% RDA), Thyme (43% RDA), Savory (42% RDA), and Parsley (32% RDA).

Top 10 Foods Highest in Vitamin D

Vitamin D is an essential vitamin required by the body for the proper absorption of calcium, bone development, control of cell growth, neuromuscular functioning, proper immune functioning, and alleviation of inflammation. A deficiency in vitamin D can lead to rickets, a disease in which bones fail to properly develop. Further, inadequate levels of vitamin D can lead to a weakened immune system, increased cancer risk, poor hair growth, and osteomalacia, a condition of weakened muscles and bones. Conversely, excess vitamin D can cause the body to absorb too much calcium, leading to increased risk of heart attack and kidney stones. The current U.S. RDA for vitamin D is 600 IU (international units) and the toxicity threshold for vitamin D is thought to be 10,000 to 40,000 IU/day.2 Vitamin D is oil soluble, which means you need to eat fat to absorb it. It is naturally found mainly in fish oils, fatty fish, and to a lesser extent in beef liver, cheese, egg yolks, and certain mushrooms. Vitamin D is also naturally made by your body when you expose your skin to the sun, and thus, is called the sun-shine vitamin. In addition, vitamin D is widely added to many foods such as milk and orange juice, and can also simply be consumed as a supplement. Below is a list of high vitamin D foods.

#1: Cod Liver Oil

Cod liver oil has been a popular supplement for many years and naturally contains very high levels of vitamin A and vitamin D. Cod liver oil provides 10001IU (1667% RDA) per 100 gram serving, or 1360IU (340% RDA) in a single tablespoon.

#2: Fish

Various types of fish are high in vitamin D. Typically raw fish contains more vitamin D than cooked, and fatty cuts will contain more than lean cuts. Further, fish canned in oil will have more vitamin D than those canned in water. Raw fish is typically eaten in the form of sushi. Raw Atlantic Herring provides the most vitamin D with 1628IU (1667% RDA) per 100 gram serving, 2996IU (499% RDA) per fillet, and 456IU (76% RDA) per ounce. It is followed by Pickled Herring with 680IU (113% RDA) per 100g serving, Canned Salmon (127% RDA), Raw Mackerel (60% RDA), Oil Packed Sardines (45% RDA), Canned Mackerel (42% RDA), and oil packed Tuna (39% RDA).

#3: Fortified Cereals

A breakfast staple in the Americas, most commercial cereals are fortified with the essential vitamins and nutrients. Exercise caution and check food labels when purchasing cereals, be sure to pick products that have little or no refined sugars, and no partially hydrogenated oils! Fortified cereals can provide up to 342IU (57% RDA) per 100 gram serving (~2 cups), and even more if combined with fortified dairy products or fortified soy milk. Products vary widely so be sure to check the nutrition label before buying.

#4: Oysters

In addition to vitamin D, Oysters are a great source of vitamin b12, zinc, iron, manganese, selenium, and copper. Oysters are also high in cholesterol and should be eaten in moderation by people at risk of heart disease or stroke. Raw wild caught Eastern Oysters provide 320IU (80% RDA) per 100 gram serving, 269IU (67% RDA) in six medium oysters.

#5: Caviar (Black and Red)

Caviar is a common ingredient in sushi and more affordable than people think. Caviar provides 232IU (58% RDA) of vitamin D per 100 gram serving, or 37.1IU (9% RDA) per teaspoon.

#6: Fortified Soy Products (Tofu and Soy Milk)

Fortified soy products are often fortified with both vitamin D and calcium. Fortified Tofu can provide up to 157IU (39% RDA) of vitamin D per 100 gram serving, or 44IU (11% RDA) per ounce. Fortified Soy Milk can provide up to 49IU (12% RDA) of vitamin D per 100 gram serving, 119IU (30% RDA) per cup. Amounts of vitamin D vary widely between products, so be sure to check nutrition facts for vitamin D content.

#7: Salami, Ham, and Sausages

Salami, Ham, and Sausages are a good source of vitamin b12, and copper. Unfortunately, they are also high in cholesterol and sodium, and so should be limited by people at risk of hypertension, heart attack, and stroke. Salami provides 62.0IU (16% RDA) of vitamin D per 100 gram serving, or 16.7IU (4% RDA) per ounce (3 slices). It is followed by Bologna Pork 56IU (9% RDA) per 100 grams, and Bratwurst 44IU (7% RDA) per 100 gram serving.

#8: Fortified Dairy Products

Dairy products are already high in calcium, so it makes sense to fortify them with vitamin D. Milk can provide up to 52.0IU (13% RDA) of vitamin D per 100 gram serving, 127IU (32% RDA) per cup. Cheese can provide up to 6.6IU (2% RDA) in a cubic inch, and butter provides 7.8IU (2% RDA) in a single tablespoon. Check nutrition labels for exact amounts.

#9: Eggs

In addition to vitamin D, eggs are a good source of vitamin B12, and protein. Eggs provide 37.0IU (9% RDA) of vitamin D per 100 gram serving, or 17.0IU (4% RDA) in a large fried egg.

#10: Mushrooms

More than just a high vitamin D food, mushrooms also provide Vitamin B5 (Pantothenic Acid) and copper. Lightly cooked white button mushrooms provide the most vitamin D with 27.0IU (7% RDA) per 100 gram serving, or 7.6IU (2% RDA) per ounce.

Top 10 Foods Highest in Zinc

Zinc is an essential mineral required by the body for maintaining a sense of smell, keeping a healthy immune system, building proteins, triggering enzymes, and creating DNA. Zinc also helps the cells in your body communicate by functioning as a neurotransmitter. A deficiency in zinc can lead to stunted growth, diarrhea, impotence, hair loss, eye and skin lesions, impaired appetite, and depressed immunity. Conversely, consuming too much zinc can disrupt absorption of copper and iron, as well as create large amounts of toxic free radicals. The current RDA for Zinc is 15mg. Below is a list of the top ten foods highest in Zinc.

#1: Oysters

Depending on type and variety oysters provide 16-182mg of zinc per 100g serving. This accounts for 110%-1200% of the RDA for zinc. The food highest in zinc is The Steamed Wild Eastern Oyster which provides 182 mg of zinc per 100g serving, or 76mg (509% RDA) in 6 oysters, and 154mg (1029% RDA) in a 3 ounce serving.

#2: Toasted Wheat Germ

Packed in jars and sold toasted, wheat germ is great to sprinkle on top of any food. Try it on salads, rice, or steamed vegetables. Toasted wheat germ provides 17mg (112% RDA) of zinc per 100g serving, which is 19mg (126% RDA) per cup, and 1.2mg (8% RDA) in a single tablespoon. Crude (untoasted) wheat germ provides 12mg (82% RDA) of zinc per 100g serving, 14mg (94% RDA) per cup, and 1mg (6% RDA) per tablespoon.

#3: Veal Liver

The liver of any animal is packed with vitamins and minerals and most commonly served as pâté or liverwurst. Veal liver has the most zinc with 12mg per 100g serving accounting for 81% of the RDA, that is 8.98mg of zinc (60% RDA) in a cooked slice of liver (80g). Liver is best prepared steamed or fried with onions and herbs.

#4: Sesame Seeds and Tahini (Sesame Butter)

Sesame products contain about 10mg of Zinc per 100g serving (70% RDA). Sesame flour can be used as a substitute for wheat flour in cakes and breads. Tahini is commonly found in hummus (a ground chickpea spread and dip of the Middle East) it will provide 4.6mg (31% RDA) of zinc per 100g serving, 0.7mg (5% RDA) per tablespoon. Whole sesame seeds provide 7.8mg/100g (52% RDA), 11mg (74% RDA) per cup, and 0.7mg (5% RDA) per tablespoon.

#5: Low Fat Roast Beef

Low fat beef shoulder, shank, and chuck all contain about 10mg (70% RDA) of zinc per 100g serving, 18mg (119% RDA) per pound, and 9mg (59% RDA) in a 3 oz serving. If you buy pre-processed roast beef be sure to consult the nutrition facts about the cut and nutrients. Not all nutrition labels report zinc, so don’t worry if you don’t see it.

#6: Roasted Pumpkin and Squash Seeds

A popular food in the Middle East and East Asia pumpkin and squash seeds contain about 10mg (70% RDA) of zinc per 100g serving, 6.6mg (59% RDA) per cup, and 3mg (19% RDA) per ounce (~85 seeds). If you can’t find these in your local supermarket you will surely find them in Middle Eastern or East Asian specialty stores. Alternatively, you can also save any pumpkin and squash seeds you have and roast them in your oven. The seeds are typically eaten by cracking the outer shell and eating the seed inside.

#7: Dried Watermelon Seeds

Much like the pumpkin and squash, watermelon seeds are popular in the Middle East and East Asia and they should be in specialty stores catering to those cultures. It is also possible to just eat the seeds raw with the watermelon. You can shell them, or just chew them up whole. Dried watermelon seeds provide 10mg (70% RDA) of zinc per 100g serving, 11mg (74 %RDA) per cup, and 3mg (19% RDA) per ounce.

#8: Dark Chocolate and Cocoa Powder

Chocolate is showing more and more health benefits and dark chocolate is coming into vogue. Unsweetened baking chocolate provides 9.6mg (64% RDA) of zinc per 100g serving (most bars are 50-100 grams). Cocoa powder will provide 6.8mg (45% RDA) per 100g, or 5.4mg (39% RDA) per cup, 0.3mg (2% RDA) per tablespoon. Most milk chocolates provide around 2.3mg (15% RDA) per 100g serving or 1mg (7% RDA) per bar. Click to see complete nutrition facts. Buy Dark Chocolate from Amazon.com

#9: Lamb (Mutton)

Lamb is a common meat in the Middle East, Mediterranean, and most of Europe, but is increasing in popularity in the Americas. Lamb provides between 4.2-8.7mg of zinc per 100g serving (28%-58% RDA) depending on cut. That is up to 7.4mg (49% RDA) in a 3 ounce serving (85 grams).

#10: Peanuts

Peanuts are a great source of zinc, 100 grams of oil roasted peanuts will provide 6.6mg (44% RDA) of zinc, or 8.8mg (59% RDA) in 1 cup chopped, 1.9mg (12% RDA) per oz. (~39 peanuts). Dry roasted peanuts will provide half as much zinc at 3.3mg (22% RDA) per 100 gram serving, or 4.8mg (32% RDA) per cup, and 1mg (6% RDA) per oz.

 

Main Source: http://www.healthaliciousness.com/most-nutritious-foods-lists.php

Complete info on vitamins and minerals: http://www.whfoods.com/nutrientstoc.php

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